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who had ascended the galleries were precipitated lifeless to the ground, by the falling in of the various parts of the buildings; while others met with the same fate from endeavouring to save themselves by leaping down. The cloister leading from the gate to the tower Xystus, was now consumed. On the following day the soldiers set fire to the remaining parts of the northern cloister which extended to the angle of the eastern, presenting from thence a view down the precipice into the valley of Cedron which was truly dreadful. Thus was this beautiful Temple, the pride and envy of ages, as well as the reverence and affection of millions, hastily endangered by those who so lately professed the greatest regard for its preservation and sanctity. Thus was it assailed by its own peculiar priests and people in the face of an heathen enemy wading through streams of blood to guard it from injury and contempt; and it is probable its demolition and ruin would not at this period have been stopped, had not Titus for a time relinquished the attempt to place it within his own immediate power.

While these engagements were carrying on by the contending parties, the famine continued to rage with renewed and inconceivable violence. The most aggra

vating

that of their enemies! The legions, from habit and strict discipline, were notorious for their martial and heroic courage; but though instigated by the alluring prospects of plunder, or the hope of glory; they had in this siege to contend with men actuated by perhaps greater motives, for absolute necessity and a perfect indifference to life, led the Jews to fight with more than equal ardour : and, indeed, the impetuosity, rage, and passion, so constantly and liberally attributed to them by Josephus, are, in many cases, but partial misrepresentations of their energy and spirit. This evident partiality to the Roman cause is easily explained, when it is remembered that this History was written in the palace of Cæsar at Rome; to whom it was afterwards dedicated.

vating circumstances conspired to complete the misery of the people, and the wretchedness of the scenes around them. Urged by necessity on the one hand, and despondency on the other, many were driven to desperation from viewing the melancholy prospect before them; while others, still borne up by hope and expectation, searched again the houses they had ransacked; if not for provisions, yet for such things as might tend in any degree to stop the gnawings of a craving appetite. With this view, they eagerly devoured whatever could be masticated, however nauseous or disgustful to the senses; and contended with each other for what, at other times, they would have been studiously anxious to avoid.?

These and other circumstances disgusting to humanity occurred daily, and multiplied with the increase of the famine,“ but,” continues the historian, “ the event I am about to relate, the truth of which I also affirm, and many living witnesses can likewise attest; has

no parallel in the annals of Grecian history, op " that of any Barbarian nation : it is horrible to men“ tion and incredible to hear."

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“A woman of noble birth beyond Jordan, having “ fled with several others and taken sanctuary in Jeru

salem; a band of ruffians stripped her of all she had “ publicly brought: and her house being daily broken

open and plundered, she was reduced to the last ex

tremity. She endeavoured, first by imploring pity, " and then by exciting their rage, to be put to death ;

“ neither,

1 FOR IN THOSE DAYS SHALL BE AFFLICTION, SUCH AS WAS NOT FROM THE BEGINNING OF THE CREATION WHICH GOD CREATED, UNTO THIS TIME, NEITHEN BHALL BE.-Mark, xiii. 19.

“ neither, however, prevailed with these merciless

monsters, who witnessed her enduring all the pangs “ of insatiate hunger without feeling or remorse : dis“ tracted at length with disappointment, and enraged " at the repeated acts of violence she had sustained, she

pitched upon the most unnatural resolution that ever

entered into the mind of a human being. Having a “ child sucking at her breast, she snatched it up in her

arms, and looking upon it with the utmost tenderness, “she thus addressed it—'What shall I do for thee, thou

most unfortunate infant, brought into the world " under a complication of three such dreadful judg

ments, as these which have now come upon us; of

war, famine, and rebellion? For which of these three “shall I reserve thee? The Romans will give thee thy “ life perhaps, but not thy liberty; famine will prevent

slavery, but our present Tyrants will be found less

supportable than either of them. What canst thou “ do better now, than supply the want of food to thy

starving mother; and by this action sting them with “ the horrour of the deed: and so finally crown the

history of the Jews with the only execrable abomi“nation that is yet wanting to perfect their misery??— “ With these words, in despair and frenzy, she plunged

a poniard in its breast, and having cut her babe in

pieces, and dressed a part of it; she devoured the “ fruit of her womb. Soon afterwards a party of the

" seditious

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1 This is the greatest misfortune that can befal a people.—The Israelites experienced it in the siege of Samaria, as we read in 2 Kings, vi. 29; and the Jews, in the siege of Jerusalem, by Nebuchadnezzar.-Lament. iv. 10. And now again in this :

THE TENDER AND DELICATE WOMAN (by which perhaps was meant her noble birth) AMONG YOU, WHO WOULD NOT ADVENTURE TO SET THE SOLE OF HER FOOT

UPON

"seditious coming in, demanded, with menaces of “ death without mercy, an immediate supply of provi

sions, the smell of which had attracted them to her " house; upon which she produced the remainder of “ her child. “This,' said she,' is in truth my son whom “I have just dressed: and as I have eaten of it, why “ should you pretend to be more nice, or more tender “ than a mother? But if you make any scruple of con“ science at the oblation : as I have already fed upon no

a part of it, you may leave the rest for me.' At this

56 the

THE SIEGE.

UPON THE GROUND FOR DELICATENESS AND TENDERNESS, HER EYE SHALL BE EVIL TOWARDS HER CHILDREN WHICH SHE SHALL BEAR; FOR SHE SHALL EAT THEM FOR WANT OF ALL THINGS, SECRETLY IN THE SIEGE AND STRAITNESS, WHEREWITH THINE ENEMY SHALL DISTRESS THEE IN THY GATES.-Deut. xxyiii. 56, 57.

THOU SHALT EAT THE FRUIT OF THINE OWN BODY, THE FLESH OF THY SONS AND OF THY DAUGHTERS, WHICH THE LORD THY GOD HATH GIVEN THEE, IN

-Deut. xxviii. 53. WOE UNTO THEM THAT ARE WITH CHII.D, AND TO THEM THAT GIVE SUCK IN THOSE DAYS! FOR THERE SHALL BE GREAT DISTRESS IN THE LAND AND WRATH UPON THIS PEOPLE.—Luke xxi. 23.

FOR BEHOLD! THE DAYS ARE COMING, IN THE WHICH THEY SHALL SAY BLESSED ARE THE BARREN, AND THE WOMBS THAT NEVER BARE, AND THE PAPS WHICH NEVER GAVE SUCK.-Luke, xxiii. 29.

1 It seems that this woman destroyed her infant, deeming it either more honourable or preferable that it should suffer death in its earliest age, than run the hazard of being murdered by other hands, or of enduring hardships in the event of its surviving, that might, to an elevated mind, be more intolerable than even death itself: but though destruction were inevitable, yet this conduct was neither properly to be considered noble, or such as might have been expected from a worshipper of the true God; from one who, enlightened by revelation, should have had a knowledge, and, consequently, a hope of better things. This event, with all its circumstances, stands without a parallel in the page of History; though the actions of the wife of Asdrubal, the Carthaginian General, in the last stage of the siege of Carthage, afford no very distant resemblance to it, while they exhibit a nobler instance of a spirited mind; particularly when it is remembered that her conduct, unlike that of the Jewess, was such as did not militate against the religious

principles

* the wretches, although inured to murder, recoiled “ with horrour at a sight so barbarous and inhuman; "and this occurrence was the only one at which they

were known, during the time of the whole siege, to " have evinced any feeling that might distinguish them "from the most ignorant and brutal of their species.”l

The report of this horrid event from being quickly spread about the city, soon reached the ears of the Romans, who, in general, either pitied or hated the people for it. Titus heard it with astonishment, and protested by his Gods, that he had done all he could to make the Jews easy, as well as happy in their lives, their liberties, and fortunes. “ If,” said he, “they “ will tear each other in pieces rather than live in union

among themselves; who can help it? If they prefer “war to peace, or famine to plenty; nay, if they will “ persist in destroying their Temple, which I have

“ endeavoured

principles of her country.—When Asdrubal, to save his own life, surrendered himself to Scipio, abandoning his wife, children, and adherents, to their fate; the former, though it were then in her power to have followed her husband's example, called upon Scipio to punish Asdrubal's treachery ; and then, while upbraiding him for his perfidy, cut the throats of her children, and throwing them into the flames, now raging around her ; rushed into the midst of them herself.—Vide Appian's Hist.

THE LORD HATH MADE GOOD HIS WORD, WHICH HE PRONOUNCED AGAINST US TO BRING UPON US GREAT PLAGUES, SUCH AS NEVER HAPPENED UNDER THE WHOLE HEAVEN, AS IT CAME TO PASS IN JERUSALEM, ACCORDING TO THE THINGS THAT WERE WRITTEN IN THE LAW OF MOSES, THAT THE MAN SHOULD EAT THE FLESH OF HIS OWN SON AND DAUGHTER.–Baruch, ii. 1, 2, 3.

THE HANDS OF THE PITIFUL WOMEN HAVE SODDEN THEIR OWN CHILDREN ; THEY WERE THEIR MEAT IN THE DESTRUCTION OF THE DAUGHTER OF MI. PEOPLE.Lament. iv. 10.

1 DAUGHTERS OF JERUSALEM! said our Saviour bearing his cross- WEEP NOT FOR ME, BUT WEEP FOR YOURSELVES AND FOR YOUR CHILDREN.

Luke xxii. 28.
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