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maxime propria verbi, pr significatio, et Græci dikaιos, ut apparet Dan. xii. 3. Apocal. xxii. 11. et alibi sæpe.

‘Et iniquitates eorum ipse portabit.] id est, auferet, per μεTwvvuìav, quia qui sordes aliquas auferunt, solent eos collo supposito portare. Abstulit Jeremias multorum peccata, ita ut diximus, corrigendo.'

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'He shall see and be satisfied:' He shall see long, unto satiety; the like phrase of speech you have in the Hebrew; Gen. xxv. 8, &c. By his knowledge.' By that knowledge which he hath of God. He shall justify many.' By his example and institution he shall convert many, even from among the heathen: this is the most proper sense of the word ps and of dikaιos in the Greek; as appeareth Dan. xii. 3. Rev. xxii. 11; &c. For he shall bear their iniquities,' that is, take them away by a metonymy; because those that take away filth, used to take it on their necks, and bear it. Jeremiah took away the sins of many, as was said, by correcting or amending them.'

The intelligent reader will easily perceive the whole Socinian poison, about the death of Christ, to be infolded in this interpretation. His knowledge is the knowledge' that he had of God, and his will, which he declares: to 'justify,' is to amend men's lives,' and to bear sin,' is to take it away. According to the analogy of this faith, you may apply the text to whom you please, as well as to Jeremiah. But the words are of another import, as we shall briefly

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1. Those words wobyn which the Vulgar Latin renders 'pro eo quod laboravit :' ad verbum, 'propter laborem animæ suæ,' which express the object of the seeing mentioned, and that wherewith he was satisfied, are not taken notice of. The travail of the soul' of Christ, is the fruit of his 'labour, travail,' and suffering: this, says the prophet, he shall see,' that is, 'receive, perceive, enjoy;' as the verb in many places signifies; verbs of sense, with the Hebrews, having very large significations: yaw saturabitur,' he shall be full and well-contented,' and pleased with the fruit that he shall have of all his labour and travail. This (saith Grotius) is, he shall see to satiety,' whereby he intends he should 'live very long,' as is evident from the places whither he sends us for an exposition of these words; Gen. xxv. 8,

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VOL. IX.

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&c. in all which mention is made of men that were old, and

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full of days.'

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1. But to live to satiety,' is to live till a man be weary of living, which may not be ascribed to the prophet.

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2. This of his long life,' was spoken of immediately before, according to the interpretation of our annotator, and is not, probably, instantly again repeated.

3. The long life of Jeremiah, by way of eminency above others, is but pretended, as hath been evinced. But,

4. How came this word to see,' to be taken neutrally, and to signify' to live?' What instance of this sense, or use He of the word, can be given? I dare boldly say, not one. shall see unto satiety,' that is, 'he shall live long.'

5. The words 'videbit, saturabitur,' do not stand in any such relation to one another or construction, as to endure to be cast into this form: it is not 'videbit diu ad satietatem ;' much less vivet ad satietatem,' but 'videbit, saturabitur.'

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6. The word 'shall see,' evidently relates to the words going before, the travail of his soul.' If it had been 'he shall see many years, or many days, and be satisfied,' it had been something. But it is, he shall see of the travail of his soul, and be satisfied.'

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2. By his knowledge n'in,' or 'by his knowledge,' 'in scientia sua,' Vulg. Lat. 'Cognitione sui,' Jun. The LXX wholly pervert all the words of this verse, except the last, as they do also of the former. That by the 'knowledge' here mentioned, is meant the knowledge of Christ taken objectively, and not the knowledge of God taken actively, as our annotator supposes, is evident from the fruit that is ascribed hereunto, which is the justification of them that have that knowledge. By his knowledge, that is, the 'knowledge of him,' they shall be justified, Phil. iii. 8. So, 'teach me thy fear,' that is, 'the fear of thee;' 'my worship,' that is, 'the worship of me.' No 'knowledge of God' in the land. But the use of this is in the next words.

'My righteous servant shall justify many:' that this term, used thus absolutely, 'My righteous servant,' is not applied to any in the Scripture besides Jesus Christ, hath been declared, especially where that is ascribed to him, which here is spoken of, can it be no otherwise understood: py' shall justify,' that is, shall absolve from their sins, and pronounce

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them righteous. Grotius would have the word here to signify, 'to make holy and righteous by instruction' and institution, as Dan. xii. 3. and Sixaloç, Rev. xxii. 11. That both these words are to be taken in a forensical signification, that commonly, mostly they are so taken in the Scriptures, that scarce one and another instance can be given to the contrary; that in the matter of our acceptation with God through Christ they can no otherwise be interpreted, hath been abundantly manifested by those who have written of the doctrine of justification at large; that is not now my present business. This I have from the text, to lay in the way of the interpretation of the learned annotator: the reason and foundation of this justification here mentioned, is in the following words, which indeed steer the sense of the whole text. For he shall bear their iniquities.' Now what justification of men is a proper effect of another's bearing their iniquities? Doubtless the acquitting of them from the guilt of their sins, on the account of their sins being so borne, and no other. But,

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Says our annotator, 'To bear their sins, is to take them away,' by a figurative expression. If this may not be understood, I suppose every one will confess that the annotator hath laboured in vain, as to his whole endeavour of applying this prophecy unto Jeremiah. If by bearing our iniquities,' be intended the undergoing of the punishment of those iniquities, and not the delivering men from their iniquities, the whole matter here treated of can relate to none but Jesus Christ; and to him it doth relate in the sense contended for. Now to evince this sense we have all the arguments that any place is capable to receive the confirmation of its proper sense by.

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For, 1. The word, as is confessed, signifies properly to 'bear,' or 'carry,' and not to take away.' Nor is it ever otherwise used in the Scripture, as hath been declared; and the proper use of a word is not to be departed from, and a figurative admitted without great necessity.

2. The whole phrase of speech of 'bearing iniquity' is constantly in the Scripture used for bearing or undergoing the punishment due to sin, as hath been proved by instances in abundance; nor can any instance to the contrary be produced.

3. The manner whereby Christ bore the iniquities of men," as described in this chapter, namely, by being wounded,' 'bruised,'' put to grief,' will admit of no interpretation, but that by us insisted on. From all which it is evident, how, violently the Scripture is here perverted by rendering, My, righteous servant shall justify many, for he shall bear their iniquities,' by, ‘Jeremiah shall instruct many in godliness, and so turn them from their sins."

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Ver. the last. Therefore will I divide him a portion with the great, and he shall divide the spoil with the strong, because he hath poured out his soul unto death, and he was numbered with transgressors, and he bare the sins of many, and made intercession for the transgressors.'

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A farther fruit of the travail of the Lord Christ in his conquest over all oppositions, in the victory he obtained, the spoils that he made, expressed after the manner of the things of men, with the causes and antecedents of his exaltation, is summarily comprised in these last words. Hereof thus Grotius.

'Dispartiam ei plurimos.'] 'Dabo ei partem in multis: id est, multos servabunt Chaldæi in ejus gratiam,' vide Jer. xxxix. 17. Et fortium dividet spolia ;] id est, Nabuzardan Magister militum, capta urbe, de præda ipsi dona mittet. Jer. xl. 5. Oblatus etiam ipsi a Chaldæis locus quantum vellet. Pro eo quod tradidit in mortem animam suam] in Hebræo, Quia effudit in mortem animam suam, id est, periculis mortis semet objecit, colendo, veritatem quæ odium parit. Vide historiam ad hanc rem oppositam, Jer. xxvi. 13. Sic Tévai vxv dici pro periculo mortis semet objicere diximus ad, John x. 11. Et cum sceleratis reputatus est.'] Ita est tractatus quo modo scelerati solent in carcere, catenis et barathro. Et peccata multorum tulit] pessime tractatus fuit permultorum improbitatem uti sup. ver. 5. Et pro transgressoribus rogavit.] 'D' est deprecari: Sensus est, eo ipso tempore cum tam dura poteretur a populis, non cessavit ad Deum preces pro eis fundere, vide Jer. xiv. 7.' &c.

I will divide him a portion with the great,' or many, that is, the Chaldeans shall preserve many for his sake; Jer. xxxix. 17. He shall divide the spoil with the strong,' that is, Nabuzardan the chief captain, the city being taken, shall

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send him gifts of the prey, Jer. xl. 5. As much land also as he would was offered him by the Chaldeans. Because he poured out his soul unto death;' that is, he exposed himself to the dangers of death, by following truth, which begets hatred. See Jer. xxvi. 13. Tévai fuxiv is spoken for exposing a man's life to danger of death. He bare the sin of many,' or was evilly treated by the wickedness of the many. And made intercession for the transgressors;' he prayed for the people,' &c.

To run briefly over this exposition,

1.' I will divide him a portion with the great; that is, the Chaldees shall save many for his sake. How is this proved? Jer. xxxix. 17, 18. Where God says, Ebedmelech, because he put his trust in him.' issue commonly, when men will wrest the Scripture to their own imaginations. Such are their proofs of what they affirm.

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2. He shall divide the spoil with the strong; that is, the city being taken, the captains of the guard gave him victuals, and a reward, and set him at liberty, as we read, Jer. xl. 5.

3. Because he poured out his soul to death;' that is, he ventured his life by preaching the truth, although he did not die. For,

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4. He bare the sin of many:' that is, by the wickedness of many he was wronged;' though this expression in the verse foregoing be interpreted, he shall take away their sins; and that when a word of a more restrained signification is used to express bearing, than that here used. At this rate a man may make application of what he will, to whom he will.

Upon the sense of the words, and their accomplishment in and upon the Lord Jesus Christ, I shall not insist. That they do not respect Jeremiah at all, is easily evinced from the consideration of the intolerable wresting of the words, and their sense by the learned annotator, to make the least allusion appear betwixt what befel him, and what is expressed.

To close these animadversions, I shall desire the reader to observe.

1. That there is not any application of these words made

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