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verse 13. The body for the Lord, to serve and honour him; and the Lord for the body, to sanctify and save it.

2. The body which is to be raised unto glory, and which (we hope) shall be made "like unto Christ's glorious body,".. is not, in the mean time, to be conspurcated and dishonoured with so impure a pollution. "But God hath raised up the Lord, and will us," verse 14.

3. The members of Christ' ought not to be made the members of a harlot; inasmuch as this is a high indignity unto Christ, that so pure and holy a head, should have so leprous and filthy members. But our bodies, by the inhabitation of the spirit of Christ in us, are his members; and therefore should not be made one flesh with a harlot; ver. 15, 16, 17.

4. That which in this is more unnatural and atrocious than other sins, in that other sins do not terminate themselves in the body, but go out unto other objects, is not to be admitted. But fornication brings a peculiar dehonestation and contumely upon the body; therefore it is not to be admitted, verse 18.

5. Temples, which are peculiarly consecrated unto God and to his service, ought not to be defiled or profaned by any sacrilegious pollutions; for, "him that defileth the temple of the Lord, he will destroy." But our bodies are temples for the Holy Spirit to dwell in; therefore ought not to be converted into stews, or receptacles of impure lusts; verse 19.

6. They who are not their own, nor in their own disposal, but belong to another Lord, are not to live after their own will, or by their own lust, but according to the will, and the ends, and uses, of their principal Lord. But we are not our own; and therefore have not the power to live according to our own lusts: but we are his that made us by his power, redeemed us by his love, dwelleth in us by his Spirit: therefore him we are to glorify by pure spirits, and chaste bodies.

So the words of the text are the last argument, which the apostle useth against that great sin, which did so abound in that rich and luxurious city; therefore Jerome, Ambrose,

d Duorum unius rei in solidum dominium esse non potest. Dig. 1. 13. Tit. 6. leg. 5. Sect. 15.

people, both himself, and his Son, and his Spirit, and all things that belong unto life and godliness. "He is not ashamed to be called their God;" (Heb. xi. 16) and giveth them leave accordingly to avouch him for their God: (Deut. xxvi. 17) and, together with himself and his Son, hath estated them in all other good things.' (Rom. viii. 32) All the gifts, endowments, graces, natural or spiritual, which he hath bestowed upon any, whether Paul, or Apollos, or Cephas, the most eminent of men, are given for them and their comfort; (1 Cor. iii. 22, 23) they are all given to profit withal; (1 Cor. xii. 7) and for the perfecting of the saints. (Ephes. iv. 12)

3. Again, We have the tenure and possession of our life, our nature, our faculties, our endowments, all the gifts and talents which are bestowed upon us. But this is not a possession of dominion, to dispose of these things at our own pleasure; we may not rashly throw away our lives, or profanely lay out our wit and learning, upon the service of Satan, or our own, or other men's lusts. But it is only a possession of custody and trust, in order to the glory of God, and to the edification, comfort, and benefit of others. For all the gifts and power which God gives, is "to profit withal, and for edification, not for destruction." (2 Cor. x. 8)

Sad then will be the account which they shall make, who, by luxury and intemperance, by challenges and duels, or by any other way of rashness and wickedness, expose their lives unto danger of ruin. Or, on the other side, do so pamper nature, and indulge to their sensual appetites, as propter vitam vivendi perdere causas,' and have their souls only for salt to keep alive their bodies, and to serve for no other purpose; who use the gifts of God against the giver of them, and have their wisdom, power, wit, learning, wealth, interests, only as a panoply of Satan, (Luke xi. 22) to fight his battles against God and his church; as Ahithophel used his wisdom against David', and Tertullus, his oratory against Paul*; and Jeroboam, his power against the prophet'; and the Scribes and Pharisees, their learning against Christ; and Libanius, Lucian, Porphyry, Celsus, and other proud philosophers, their wits and pens against Christian religion.

i 2 Sam. xvi. 20, xvii. 1.

Acts xxiv. 1, 2.

11 Kings xiii. 4.

Here then offers itself a weighty and serious question to be resolved, namely, When doth a man act as if he were his own, as if he had the original propriety and plenary possession and dominion over himself?

In the general, I answer, When a man doth exempt himself from all superior jurisdiction,-will be subordinate unto none; and from all brotherly communion,-will be co-ordinate unto none; will neither live to the glory of God above him, or the use and benefit of his brethren about him; will be, as it were, alone; (Isa. v. 8) and as if he had a kind of deity and sufficiency within himself: as Tyrus said, "I am a God; I sit in the seat of God; and did set her heart as the heart of God." (Ezek. xxviii. 2) And as Nebuchadnezzar said, “Is not this Babylon the Great, that I have built for the house of my kingdom, and for the honour of my majesty ?" (Dan. iv. 30) And as Pharaoh, "Who is the Lord, that I should obey his voice, and let Israel go?” (Exod. v. 2)

But more particularly we shall resolve this question in four propositions:

A man acteth and liveth, as if he were his own, and in his own disposal;

1. When he maketh his own reason his supreme rule, by which to work.

2. When he maketh his own will his chief law and authority therein.

3. When he maketh his own interest his ultimate end in working.

4. When he maketh his own performances the principal ground of all his hopes.

1. When a man makes his own reason his supreme rule, resolving, as Jeroboam did, to follow what "his own heart hath devised and contrived." (1 Kings xii. 33) Reason indeed is the candle' of the Lord; (Prov. xx. 27) but what is a candle to the sun-beam? unto which the apostle compareth the gospel. (Rom. x. 18) The Lord will have no disputing, or replying against him; (Rom. ix. 20) but will have human. reason strike sail, and captivate itself to the word of God.

For stating of this point, we are to distinguish between carnal reason and right reason. Carnal reason, or reason darkened and corrupted by the original pravity which cleaveth unto it, is enmity against God;' and neither is, nor

people, both himself, and his Son, and his Spirit, and all things that belong unto life and godliness. "He is not ashamed to be called their God;" (Heb. xi. 16) and giveth them leave accordingly to avouch him for their God: (Deut. xxvi. 17) and, together with himself and his Son, hath estated them in all other good things.' (Rom. viii. 32) All the gifts, endowments, graces, natural or spiritual, which he hath bestowed upon any, whether Paul, or Apollos, or Cephas, the most eminent of men, are given for them and their comfort; (1 Cor. iii. 22, 23) they are all given to profit withal; (1 Cor. xii. 7) and for the perfecting of the saints. (Ephes. iv. 12)

3. Again, We have the tenure and possession of our life, our nature, our faculties, our endowments, all the gifts and talents which are bestowed upon us. But this is not a possession of dominion, to dispose of these things at our own pleasure; we may not rashly throw away our lives, or profanely lay out our wit and learning, upon the service of Satan, or our own, or other men's lusts. But it is only a possession of custody and trust, in order to the glory of God, and to the edification, comfort, and benefit of others. For all the gifts and power which God gives, is "to profit withal, and for edification, not for destruction." (2 Cor. x. 8)

Sad then will be the account which they shall make, who, by luxury and intemperance, by challenges and duels, or by any other way of rashness and wickedness, expose their lives unto danger of ruin. Or, on the other side, do so pamper nature, and indulge to their sensual appetites, as propter vitam vivendi perdere causas,' and have their souls only for salt to keep alive their bodies, and to serve for no other purpose;—who use the gifts of God against the giver of them, and have their wisdom, power, wit, learning, wealth, interests, only as a panoply of Satan, (Luke xi. 22) to fight his battles against God and his church; as Ahithophel used his wisdom against David', and Tertullus, his oratory against Paul*; and Jeroboam, his power against the prophet'; and the Scribes and Pharisees, their learning against Christ; and Libanius, Lucian, Porphyry, Celsus, and other proud philosophers, their wits and pens against Christian religion.

2 Sam. xvi. 20, xvii. 1.

* Acts xxiv. 1, 2.

1 Kings xiii. 4.

Here then offers itself a weighty and serious question to be resolved, namely, When doth a man act as if he were his own, as if he had the original propriety and plenary possession and dominion over himself?

In the general, I answer, When a man doth exempt himself from all superior jurisdiction,-will be subordinate unto none; and from all brotherly communion,—will be co-ordinate unto none; will neither live to the glory of God above him, or the use and benefit of his brethren about him; will be, as it were, alone; (Isa. v. 8) and as if he had a kind of deity and sufficiency within himself: as Tyrus said, "I am a God; I sit in the seat of God; and did set her heart as the heart of God." (Ezek. xxviii. 2) And as Nebuchadnezzar said, “Is not this Babylon the Great, that I have built for the house of my kingdom, and for the honour of my majesty?" (Dan. iv. 30) And as Pharaoh, "Who is the Lord, that I should obey his voice, and let Israel go?" (Exod. v. 2)

But more particularly we shall resolve this question in four propositions:

A man acteth and liveth, as if he were his own, and in his own disposal;

1. When he maketh his own reason his supreme rule, by which to work.

2. When he maketh his own will his chief law and authority therein.

3. When he maketh his own interest his ultimate end in working.

4. When he maketh his own performances the principal ground of all his hopes.

1. When a man makes his own reason his supreme rule, resolving, as Jeroboam did, to follow what " his own heart hath devised and contrived." (1 Kings xii. 33) Reason indeed is the 'candle' of the Lord; (Prov. xx. 27) but what is a candle to the sun-beam? unto which the apostle compareth the gospel. (Rom. x. 18) The Lord will have no disputing, or replying against him; (Rom. ix. 20) but will have human reason strike sail, and captivate itself to the word of God. For stating of this point, we are to distinguish between carnal reason and right reason. Carnal reason, or reason darkened and corrupted by the original pravity which cleaveth unto it, is enmity against God;' and neither is, nor

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