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Man, but fuch a Law however is good in it felf, of which fort are all the Precepts of the Moral Law. I answer, it is an uncontroulable Maxim, that Ceffante ratione Legis reffat Lex, (i. e. as to the Equity of it, or the reasonableness of its being put in execution; for a Legislator may fometimes prudently forbear the direct express Repealing of a Law, tho it be not for the prefent beneficial, or fit to be made ufe of) and the Reafon of a Law evermore then ceafeth, when it becomes unferviceable to the End, or unufeful to procure or further the Good for which it was made; fo that if it were poffible, that the Moral Law could ceafe to be ferviceable (to as many as ufe it aright) to the End for which it was given, namely, to advance Humane Nature towards its Perfection, by the Fruition of Mans Chief Good, it would ceafe to be a Law. For let Aquinas be in the right, that Scientia Dei eft canja fcitorum ab ipfo, 1. par Quæft. 14. Art. 9. 3. and confequently that Gods feeing a Law to be perpetually good, makes it to be really fo; yet it is no otherwife, then by feeing it to be a perpetual fit, apt, and proper means to further the procuring of the End defigned to be obtained by the true Obfervers of it, there

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to the Advantage of those who are obliged to it. If it be replied that Subjects however owe Obedience to their Sovereigns in a proper fenfe, and yet Thefe feek their own, as well as their Peoples Benefit; Irejoyn, that fince Sovereign Princes cannot without the Aid and Help of others, maintain their Authority (as the Almighty can do his, which makes a difference in that refpect between him and all other Governours) for the Prefervation of the People they are to arule, unless They themselves be preferved in Perfon, Power, and Wealth agreeable to their Office 3 it is abfolutely requifite, that They fhould reap fuch Benefit by the Obedi ence of their Subjects, as is neceflary to preferve Themselves and their Government, no less then the People committed to their Charge. If it be yet ftill further urged, that admitting God cannot give a Conmand but only fuch as tends to the Good of the Creature, yet it does not follow thence, that this End is the Ratio formalis, thevery Reafon of the goodness of the Command, but a neceffary Confequent only of it; for whatsoever is agreeable to the eternal Rectitude of the Divine Wisdom to be made a Law, Obedience thereunto muft of neceffity be good to

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Man, but fuch a Law however is good in it felf, of which fort are all the Precepts of the Moral Law. I anfwer, it is an uncontroulable Maxim, that Ceffante ratione Legis ceffat Lex, (i. e. as to the Equity of it, or the reasonableness of its being put in execution; for a Legislator may fometimes prudently forbear the direct exprefs Repealing of a Law, tho it be not for the prefent beneficial, or fit to be made ufe of) and the Reafon of a Law evermore then ceafeth, when it becomes unferviceable to the End, or unuseful to procure or further the Good for which it was made; fo that if it were poffible, that the Moral Law could ceafe to be ferviceable (to as many as ufe it aright) to the End for which it was given, namely, to advance Humane Nature towards its Perfection, by the Fruition of Mans Chief Good, it would ceafe to be a Law For let Aquinas be in the right, that Scientia Dei eft canja feitorum ab ipfo, 1. par Quæft. 14. Art. 9. 3m. and confequently that Gods feeing a Law to be perpetually good, makes it to be really fo; yet it is no otherwife, then by feeing it to be a perpetual fit, apt, and proper means to further the procuring of the End defigned to be obtained by the true Obfervers of it, thereH

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by. From which confideration it is apparent, why a perpetual Obligation lies upon all Men to keep the Moral Lam, namely, because it is at all times beneficial (if fincerely obeyed) to every one for promoving his everlafting Welfare; and not meerly because it is according to the eternal Recti tude of the Divine Mind, for fo is alfo every pofitive Command of God, for whatever God once approves of, he eternally approves of as good for what, and fo long as he intended it; for the longer or shorter Continuance of any of Gods Ordinances, or Inftitutions, or the more or lefs ufefulnefs they are of towards the End to be obtained by them, makes them neither more nor lefs agreeable to the eternal Rectitude t of the Divine Wisdom, which exactly fits every thing the Almighty inftitutes for the Occafion he intends it, with irreversible Council; the whole Change which ever happens in Divine Commands, being wholly for the Creatures Sake, to whofe variable Condition in feveral Ages of the World, feveral different Inftitutions and Difpenfations have been fuited by the eternal immutable Wisdom and good Will of God Opera mutat Deus, fed non confilia. St. Auguft.

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Mans Recovery from his laps'd and loft Condition wherein it confifts, and how wrought. Natural ways and means unable of themselves: to procure it. Supernatural Caufes chiefly prevalent to that End. Of these the Free Love of God to Man, and the Incarnation of bis eternal only begotten Son, with the Confequents of it are the chief.

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requires to be eternally glorified the la ing him with all the Bleart, and with all the Soul, and with all the Mind grandthat fo to love him is Maniltimate End,vandet verlafting Blifs (Sec 4) Secondly's Thar! Man by: Creation was placed a Londitio on, through the Redinide of his Intelle& and Integrity of his Will, and the due fub ordination of the inferior Fatisk,otogel ther with a goodGongitation of Body, which put him in the direct Way towards the obtaining of that his Ultimate End and chiefelt Gooded (raeds 41) Thirdly, That by eating of the forbidden Fruit, Man fell from that Condition wherein he was crea·H 2 ted

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